Doctors expect uptick of serious coronavirus-linked syndrome in kids: report

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While children generally do not suffer serious outcomes after coronavirus infection, complications do happen. 

Doctors at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah on Monday said they expect to see an uptick of a potentially fatal coronavirus-linked syndrome in children called multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), according to local outlet KSL.com.

Dr. Jason Lake, a pediatric infectious disease expert with Primary Children’s, estimated that the hospital has seen 20 MIS-C cases since late April. However, amid surging coronavirus cases across the Midwest and nationwide, doctors anticipate additional MIS-C cases. 

While children generally do not suffer serious outcomes after coronavirus infection, complications do happen. (iStock)

While children generally do not suffer serious outcomes after coronavirus infection, complications do happen. (iStock)

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While the medical community continues to learn more about MIS-C, the syndrome is said to occur several weeks after initial exposure. It usually involves shock, heart malfunction, stomach pain and hyperinflammation.

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the syndrome among adults as well: “multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults” (MIS-A).

Some mild cases among kids can develop into a serious infection, Lake said, according to the outlet.

The doctor’s warning came as 12-year-old Madilyn Dayton, who was treated at Primary Children’s Hospital, was recently released from the hospital after an experience with MIS-C. 

Dayton reportedly first developed a headache, which cascaded into head pain, fever and muscle pain. The girl’s family wasn’t aware of any coronavirus infection, though she later tested positive for antibodies. She ultimately required four days of intensive care, and two more days in the hospital, and is still recovering from the disease’s toll on her heart, said the report.

According to the CDC, it is unclear exactly what causes MIS-C, though the symptoms include fever, “vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, bloodshot eyes, or feeling extra tired,” says the agency’s webpage.

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